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Anonymous asked:

If a 13 year old is extremely smart and interested in cardiothoracic surgery, what books can you recommend? Please don't list easy books, this 13 year old spends almost his entire day researching and watching mitral valve replacement, and ex vivo surgeries. Can you please help?

honestly, i would recommend forgetting about medicine for now and just focus on just living life.. medical school will be there no matter what.. and regardless of what you do beforehand, nothing prepares you for it.. plus, just watching surgeries all day doesn’t make you an expert at them.. the point of being a doctor isn’t doing the procedure.. rather, it’s about figuring out what is wrong and how to fix it.. watching 1000000 surgeries won’t teach you that.. so go and live life.. take it from someone who’s been through the ringer..

mediclopedia:

Fetal Pacemakers

We have developed a novel micropacemaker to address the critical problem of complete heart block in the fetus.  This condition is a life-threatening emergency in a fetus, and is nearly always fatal if hydrops fetalis develops at a young gestational age. There are currently no effective treatment options in these cases, and attempts to implant an extra-uterine pacemaker with electrodes on the fetal heart have invariably failed due to lead dislodgement from fetal movement.

Researchers at USC have created a fetal pacemaker. There are lots of research like this being done across the U.S. The photograph above shows a surgery from Children’s Cincinnati where they are implanting a pacemaker to a child in utero.This is where I want to be.
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Olympus C2000Z
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mediclopedia:

Fetal Pacemakers

We have developed a novel micropacemaker to address the critical problem of complete heart block in the fetus.  This condition is a life-threatening emergency in a fetus, and is nearly always fatal if hydrops fetalis develops at a young gestational age. There are currently no effective treatment options in these cases, and attempts to implant an extra-uterine pacemaker with electrodes on the fetal heart have invariably failed due to lead dislodgement from fetal movement.

Researchers at USC have created a fetal pacemaker. There are lots of research like this being done across the U.S. The photograph above shows a surgery from Children’s Cincinnati where they are implanting a pacemaker to a child in utero.

This is where I want to be.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

When you say that we will have no life outside of the OR, do you mean during residency? Or forever?

Forever sounds a bit harsh. But surgery is not a specialty that gets easier after residency. It is actually one of the few, if not the only specialty in medicine that gets harder after residency. Why? Because you have no more work hour restrictions. That means that you can spend all day at the hospital doing procedures if you want to and most of the time, to make a living, that’s exactly what you’ll end up doing.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Does surgery take time out of ALL of my family life?

Depends on the kind of surgeon you become. But it is straining on the family because surgeons have a lot of emergencies and get pulled into the office to save a person’s life. They are perhaps one of the most selfless individuals, but almost to a fault. So, to answer your question, it really depends.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

If I'm looking for a fast-paced, interesting & exciting/intense career, is surgery really as close to that as they make it sound?

It’s not fast paced at all. Sure, it’s a rush getting to cut someone open and save their lives. But you have to love what you do, especially if you’re going to be a surgeon. You have to be willing to stand in the OR for hours and hours on end without a break in some cases. So, surgery is one of the extremes of medicine. It’s gratifying, but hard as hell at the same time.

mediclopedia:

We are constantly hearing about the wonders of 3D printing. A lot of it involves very difficult tissue engineering.. which is great, but there are other uses for it too!

Surgeons at Kosair Children’s Hospital (Louisville Kentucky) used the 3D printer to create a 3D rendering of a child’s heart. Instead of trying to figure out a defect in a heart using the traditional CT scanner, this allows for a better understanding of the nature of the defect and also gives the surgeon an opportunity to create a better plan for the surgery. 

The best part of this is that it only cost ~$600 (excluding the price of the printer)! Can anyone buy me a printer?!?

mediclopedia:

Corkscrew Esophagus

No one knows exactly why this happens, but it occurs when instead of muscles of the esophagus contracting segment by segment to move the food down, it contracts all at the same time resulting in this twist. 

As you can imagine it causes great discomfort, digestive problems, and of malnutrition. Although it is a rare occurrence and most physicians will never see one, Vanderbilt university has a GI clinic that sees patients like this everyday. 

They have tried many different things, but one temporary fix is using botox. Any good ideas out there?

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